Many people suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder after facing any bad incident; and when it comes to war, what can be more tragic than it?
Alex Brown had seen Iraq war two times and he found himself very disturbed.

Alex and Skip Nathan Cornetet/Fusion Photography

Alex and Skip
Nathan Cornetet/Fusion Photography

Alex shared his experience by saying, “My job as a gunner was to literally see everything. Not only my life, but my team’s life depended on it.”

When he got back home to Louisville, Ky., he wasn’t able to leave war horrors behind. He was haunted by the fear and don’t feel save even at his house. He was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

He said that he didn’t leave his room and neither interact with people much, which is affecting not only him but his family also. He said that he would have suicide.

Alex’s life changed when he came to know about the K9s for soldiers. This initiative of a Shari Duval has helped many PTSD patients.  She is a grandmother from Florida and faced the same situation with his son in 2005, when he had spent 9-month in Iraq war.

Shari Duvan, with her son, Brett Simon, and his dog, Reagan Todd Galley / K9s for Warriors

Shari Duvan, with her son, Brett Simon, and his dog, Reagan
Todd Galley / K9s for Warriors

Duval found a solution in pairing a dog with the patients; this has helped his son and so many other veterans. She said, “These dogs work miracles.”
Her organization has 500 volunteers. Until now, this group has helped 96 people to have a dog. At Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., ranch house, they offer a live session of three weeks which helps the owners to bind with the dogs.

According to a psychologist Tracy Stecker, who works at Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center, dogs are really helpful in reducing anxiety. Their unconditional love allows developing trust, which is very much needed in PTSD.

Brown is happily living now, he says for his dog, “Every day is a battle for me but I don’t have to go through it alone anymore.”

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